Upcoming Exhibitions 

 

    
Buster Graybill

Buster Graybill | Leisure Lines

Sept 14, 2017 - Nov 12, 2017
Russell Hill Rogers Gallery I | Santikos Building
Free and open to the public

Opening Reception: Thurs, Sept 14, 2017 from 5:30 - 7:30 pm

San Antonio artist Buster Graybill utilizes sculpture, installation, video and photography to traverse and reconnect with often overlooked places found in the rural landscape. Harvesting memories, stories, language, and objects from the rich cultural geography of rural America, Graybill’s work is informed by the subtle shifts and rapid changes that are occurring in the landscape as urban sprawl continues to consume and displace both nature and culture. His projects explore these moments and places of change, addressing themes of adaptation, displacement, and re-contextualization. In his own words, Graybill’s artwork, “fluctuates between the conflicting vernaculars of country grammar and art speak; between formal and conceptual; between intuition and intellect; and between performance and production.”

Shown: Buster Graybill, Leisure Lines (Composition 1), 2016, Polypropylene Webbing on panel

    
Chris Engman

Chris Engman | Prospect and Refuge

Sept 14, 2017 - Nov 12, 2017
Russell Hill Rogers Gallery II | Santikos Building
Free and open to the public

Opening Reception: Thurs, Sept 14, 2017 from 5:30 - 7:30 pm

In his photographic works, Chris Engman examines the most fundamental of issues related to the human condition: the inexplicable fact of our existence, the ungraspable experience of time, and the illusive and unknowable nature of reality. In so doing, he calls attention to the gulf that exists between how we see and how we think we see; how we think and how we think we think; and the inconstant and constructed nature of memory. Engman’s photographs are documentations of the artist’s sculptures, interventions, and installations but they are also records of actions and elaborate processes. Days are spent, sometimes with a crew but more often in solitude, silently driving, carrying supplies, erecting structures and sets, and studying the slow progress of the sun overhead and its all-powerful, comfort-giving-and–taking effects. Created in close collaboration with the movements of the sun, precisely observed, Engman sees his photographic works as acts of reverence and participation in a deep and reassuring natural order much larger than ourselves.

Shown: Chris Engman, Landscape for Candace, 2015, pigment print, courtesy of the artist and Greg Kucera Gallery